Health & Wellness with Mazola®

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TOP 10 WAYS TO IMPROVE YOUR HEART HEALTH WITH MAZOLA®

Swap Your Cooking Oil

Corn oil is more effective in lowering cholesterol than olive oil.¹

Add Colorful Fruits & Veggies

to your diet to add nutritional value.

Downsize Your Plate

to avoid overeating and “cleaning your plate.”

Assign 1 Day to Meal Plan

to limit nights you eat out and save time and money.

Exercise Regularly

to lower “bad” cholesterol.²

Up Your Fiber Intake

5–10 grams of soluble fiber helps reduce “bad” cholesterol.³

Limit Foods High in Saturated Fats

to help reduce cholesterol intake.³

Swap Out Beef for Fatty Fish 2x/wk

Look for fish rich in omega-3s.⁴

Eat Nuts

4x/wk to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease.⁵

Get 7–9 Hours of Sleep

Lack of sleep can slow metabolism and make it difficult to lose weight.⁶

Cholesterol 101

Cholesterol is a waxy substance that comes from your body and food. Your body needs some cholesterol to function properly and to produce hormones, vitamin D and the bile acids that help you digest fat. When you have too much cholesterol, health problems, such as heart disease, may develop.

Your body, and especially your liver, makes all the cholesterol you need and circulates it through the blood.

It is also found in foods such as meat, poultry and full-fat dairy products. Your liver produces more cholesterol when you eat a diet high in saturated and trans fats. There are two types of cholesterol: the “bad” kind (LDL) and the “good” kind (HDL). Too much LDL (bad) cholesterol or not enough HDL (good) cholesterol puts you at risk for heart disease, heart attack and stroke.

Heart disease remains the number-one cause of death in the United States.

CORN OIL VS. EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL

A study found that Mazola® Corn Oil lowers cholesterol more than extra virgin olive oil. Fifty-four healthy men and women took part in the study, which showed that eating foods made with corn oil resulted in lower levels of total cholesterol than eating the same foods made with extra virgin olive oil.1 Click here to see a study summary.

The Study

Two teams were given a balanced diet for 21 days that included three foods made with either a total of 4
tablespoons of corn oil or 4 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil.

    Bowl of Yogurt
    Rosemary Garlic or Wheat Dinner Roll
    Carrot Cake or Pumpkin Muffin

    All other foods in the diet remained the same.

Two teams were given a balanced diet for 21 days that included three foods made with either a total of 4
tablespoons of corn oil or 4 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil.

    Bowl of Yogurt
    Carrot Cake or Pumpkin Muffin
    Rosemary Garlic or Wheat Dinner Roll

    All other foods in the diet remained the same.

The Results


CORN OIL’S VERSATILITY

Corn Oil 400-450f vs 325-375f. Corn oil has a higher smoke point than EVOOCorn Oil 400-450f vs 325-375f. Corn oil has a higher smoke point than EVOO

Corn oil’s neutral taste, uniform color and high smoke point make it great for everything from grilling and sautéing to stir-frying and baking.

¹Maki K, Lawless A, Kelley K, Kaden V, Geiger C, Dicklin M. Corn oil improves the plasma lipoprotein lipid profile compared with extra-virgin olive oil consumption in men and women with elevated cholesterol; results from a randomized feeding trial. J Clin Lipidol. Article in press. Accessed December 10, 2014. Study sponsored in part by ACH Food Companies, Inc.

SUBSTITUTION CHART

The Mazola® Substitution Chart

You can help reduce your cholesterol the easy way by replacing butter, margarine or other higher saturated fat oils with Mazola® cooking oil.* When preparing recipes, use the adjacent chart to guide you in how to substitute your butter or margarine ingredients with Mazola®, letting you prepare meals that are better for you and taste great too!

*To achieve cholesterol reduction, one serving of Mazola® corn oil must be part of a healthy diet and replace a similar amount of butter or other higher saturated fat oil. Very limited and preliminary scientific evidence suggests that eating about 1 tbsp (16 grams) of corn oil daily may reduce the risk of heart disease due to the unsaturated fat content in corn oil. FDA concludes there is little scientific data supporting this claim. To achieve this possible benefit, corn oil is to replace a similar amount of saturated fat and not increase the total number of calories you eat in a day. See product pages for more information about corn, canola, vegetable plus, corn plus, and olive oils.

KNOW YOUR FATS

Believe it or not, not all fats are the same. In fact, some fats are important parts of a healthy diet. Studies suggest unsaturated fats (the good fats) may even help lower cholesterol when eaten as part of a low-saturated-fat and low-cholesterol diet. High levels of bad fats, like saturated fats, trans fats and dietary cholesterol, can raise blood cholesterol.

Choose your fats wisely.

Choose fats and oils with 2 grams or less saturated fat per tablespoon, such as corn, soybean, canola, olive and sunflower oils. Substituting saturated fats with unsaturated fats can help reduce the risk of heart disease!*

Read food labels carefully.

When reading a label, don’t only look at the levels of cholesterol–check for the saturated fats! Coconut oil, palm oil and palm kernel oil are high in saturated fats, even though they have no cholesterol. Substitute coconut, palm and palm kernel oils with unsaturated fats such as polyunsaturated fats and monounsaturated fats found in Mazola® corn, canola and vegetable oil blends.

Look for added benefits.

In addition to being a naturally cholesterol-free** source of unsaturated fat, Mazola® cooking oil contains vitamin E.

Eat healthy without sacrificing great taste.

Prepare your delicious dishes with unsaturated fats such as Mazola® cooking oils to help reduce your risk of heart disease* without losing great taste!

*Very limited and preliminary scientific evidence suggests that eating about 1 tbsp (16 grams) of corn oil daily may reduce the risk of heart disease due to the unsaturated fat content in corn oil. FDA concludes there is little scientific evidence supporting this claim. To achieve this possible benefit, corn oil is to replace a similar amount of saturated fat and not increase the total number of calories you eat in a day. See product pages for more information about corn, canola, vegetable plus, corn plus, and olive oils. **Mazola corn, canola, soybean and olive oils are cholesterol-free foods that contain 14 g of total fat per serving. See nutrition information on product label or at Mazola.com for fat and saturated fat content.

WHAT ARE PLANT STEROLS?

What are plant sterols?

Plant sterols, or phytosterols, are plant-based micro-nutrients in fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, cereals, legumes and vegetable oils.1 Studies show that, when consumed as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol, plant sterols can help reduce the absorption of cholesterol in the gut, which can lower LDL blood cholesterol.2

1USDA and USDHHS 2010
2USDA and USDHHS 2010; FDA 2000, 2010; Wu et al. 2009; Demonty et al. 2008, Ellegard et al. 2008; Mensink et al. 2010.
3Research was conducted online using Synovate’s omnibus service, eNation. Each eNation wave conducts 1,000 U.S. consumer interviews (500 male, 500 female) that are geographically and demographically reflective of the U.S. adult population. 818 interviews were conducted among cooking oil users. Results for these 818 respondents have a confidence interval of +/- 3.4% at the 95% level. Interviewing occurred July 19–21, 2011.
4USDA FoodData Central (2019)
Corn oil has plant sterols content of 135.6 mg/serving vs. 29.8 mg/serving for olive oil. Based on analysis of corn oil and April 2019 USDA FoodData Central data for olive oil.

How can I get more plant sterols in my diet?

Using cooking oil is an easy way to incorporate plant sterols into your diet. In fact, according to a recent survey, 81 percent of respondents say they use cooking oil at least once a week.3 But not all cooking oils are equal…

Corn oil contains the highest amount of naturally occurring plant sterols per serving compared to any other popular cooking oil. Corn oil contains four times as many plant sterols as olive oil and three times as many as vegetable (soybean) oil!4 So make the switch to corn oil today.

THE MYPLATE FOOD GUIDE

Did you know that some fats are good for your heart?

The USDA officially released the Food Guide Pyramid in 1992 to help the American public make dietary choices that would maintain good health and reduce the risk of chronic disease. The updated guide, now known as the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, was released in 2011. This guide provides information on a total diet that meets nutrient needs from food sources and aims to moderate or limit dietary components often consumed in excess.

The guide recommends that most of the fats you eat should be polyunsaturated (PUFA) or monounsaturated (MUFA). Oils are the major source of MUFAs and PUFAs in the diet. PUFAs contain some fatty acids that are necessary for health—called “essential fatty acids.” Because oils contain these essential fatty acids, there is an allowance for oils in the MyPlate food guide separate from the discretionary calorie allowance.

The MUFAs and PUFAs found in vegetable oils, fish and nuts do not raise LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels in the blood and may in fact lower them. In addition to the essential fatty acids they contain, oils are the major source of vitamin E in typical American diets.

Though some vegetable oil is needed for health, oils still contain calories. Keep the amount of oils consumed within the total allowed for caloric needs. A person’s allowance for oils depends on age, sex and level of physical activity. Click this link for daily allowances.

The Nutrition Facts label also provides information to help you make smart choices. Look for amounts of polyunsaturated, monounsaturated and saturated fat under the total fat listing.

ABOUT GMOs

Getting to know GMOs

ACH Food Companies, Inc. recognizes the concerns that some consumers may have regarding genetically modified ingredients. There is an agreement of GM ingredients’ safety among food regulatory bodies that have approved GM ingredients. This includes the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Health Canada and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The World Health Organization has stated that “the development of GM organisms (GMOs) offers the potential for increased agricultural productivity or improved nutritional value that can contribute directly to enhancing human health and development.” ACH offers ingredients and foods that contain GMOs as well as ingredients that are organic and non-GMO.

ACH is committed to selling our consumers safe ingredients and foods and believes that biotechnology can help in that effort.

For more information about GMOs, visit www.factsaboutgmos.org